By Fr. Ray Diesbourg, MSC

(New York Community)

Remember how it wasn’t all that long ago that local folks travelled freely, going to such places as Syracuse, Rochester, Kingston and even Lake Placid? The pandemic has seriously reduced such travel. Now everyone stays close to home and six feet apart!

But there’s another journey that we are all on; and it doesn’t require any miles of travel. We hear about it in our Gospel reading for this past Sunday (5th of Easter). Jesus says, “In my Father’s house there are many dwelling places. If there were not, would I have told you that I am going to prepare a place for you? And if I go and prepare a place for you, I will come back again and take you to myself, so that where I am you also may be.” So we are on a journey to the dwelling place in the Father’s house. That’s our true home, our ultimate goal, our final resting place. This journey is why we were created; its destination is where we are meant to be.

Now we have a choice about how we make this journey. It’s either a field of land mines or an adventure. If it’s a mine field, we walk gingerly, fearful of stepping on mines that could explode. There’s a lot of doom and gloom around us. We tend to be negative and pessimistic and we are often sad.

If it’s an adventure, we forge ahead, unafraid, even though we still need to be cautious. Our travel guide is Jesus, who begins his remarks about the Father’s house with the words, “Do not let your hearts be troubled.” We walk with confidence because we know that Jesus is “the way, the truth and the life.”

Of course, the journey to the Father’s house will vary for each of us. Sometimes we may take a by-pass or wander toward an off-road distraction. So it’s important that we travel together, like a pilgrimage. That means we need community; we need the church; we need the Eucharist because that’s what gives us the energy we need to continue the journey.

So let us pray for the heroes who are companions on our journey. Let us pray that more people will be inspired to follow Jesus, who is the way, the truth and the life. And let us pray that we will soon be able to come together again to support one another in person as we journey to the dwelling place in the Father’s house.

Blessings, Fr. Ray

Many years ago, the great St. Augustine came up with a famous phrase that captures our greatest longing. He wrote this about God: “You have made us for yourself, and our hearts are restless until they rest in you.” Our hearts are always looking for true and abiding peace, a place to call home.

Fr. Frank J. Timar, MSC (Pennsylvania Community)

Father Frank professed his first vows on September 14, 1952 and was ordained on July 13, 1958. He is in residence at our Sacred Heart Villa in Center Valley, Pennsylvania.

This weekend, I invite you to reflect on one of the most soothing and comforting pictures we have of Jesus. Jesus must like it too, because it is what He calls Himself, the Good Shepherd.

Fr. Frank J. Timar, MSC (Pennsylvania Community)

Father Frank professed his first vows on September 14, 1952 and was ordained on July 13, 1958. He is in residence at our Sacred Heart Villa in Center Valley, Pennsylvania.

Thank you so much for spending some time with me, reflecting on one of the most touching resurrection appearances Jesus had with Cleopas and his companion. The two disciples of Jesus were totally depressed and discouraged. Just two days before, their friend Jesus was killed. They had hoped that Jesus was going to make a difference, but, after all, that has happened, it seems that it was just a pipe dream. Now, they are leaving Jerusalem and heading home to Emmaus, their hopes unfulfilled.

Fr. Frank J. Timar, MSC (Pennsylvania Community)

Father Frank professed his first vows on September 14, 1952 and was ordained on July 13, 1958. He is in residence at our Sacred Heart Villa in Center Valley, Pennsylvania.

One of the most interesting resurrection encounters concerns the Apostle Thomas, one in which he is given a dubious title of “doubting Thomas. Let’s not be too tough on him. After all, the cross had crushed his faith in Jesus, and even his closest friends couldn’t get him to believe. They insisted that Jesus was raised from the dead and they had seen Him. But Thomas needed proof, like putting his fingers in the nail marks on Jesus’ hands and feet and put his hand into Jesus’ side. When Jesus invites him to do so, Thomas comes up with the greatest expression of faith when he acknowledges Jesus as “My Lord and my God.”

Fr. Frank J. Timar, MSC (Pennsylvania Community)

Father Frank professed his first vows on September 14, 1952 and was ordained on July 13, 1958. He is in residence at our Sacred Heart Villa in Center Valley, Pennsylvania.

Peter and John came to the tomb and both of them noticed the linens, but it was John who “saw and believed” even though he still did not comprehend the whole of it or what really happened. Mary stayed at the tomb and wept. When Jesus asked why she was weeping, she didn’t even recognize Him, the very person she was looking for, because her mind was fixed on finding a dead body. Not until Jesus called her by name, did she recognize Him. Her beloved teacher is alive! She went back to the apostles and told them, “I have seen the Lord” Then she shared everything Jesus had said to her.

Fr. Frank J. Timar, MSC (Pennsylvania Community)

Father Frank professed his first vows on September 14, 1952 and was ordained on July 13, 1958. He is in residence at our Sacred Heart Villa in Center Valley, Pennsylvania.

Reflections for the Holy Week by the Missionaries of the Sacred Heart

By Fr. Ray Diesbourg, MSC

(New York Community)

It’s very quiet here on a cloudy Sunday afternoon. Meteorologically the days seem longer and the nights shorter. But for many it’s also true psychologically—the days are long and the nights short. We would appear to be “wholly weak” were it not for Holy Week.

As Jesus entered Jerusalem on Palm Sunday, he was hailed, loved and welcomed. Just a few days later he was scorned, hated and rejected. His experience can be a strength for us in dealing with the difficulties of life. If we join our crosses to his, we can expect resurrection as well. All this week, Holy Week, we celebrate the events that lead to our salvation.

As we deal with the magnitude of the coronavirus devastation, especially in larger cities, it’s important to remember the even greater magnitude of Jesus’ Passion, Death, and Resurrection. By conquering even death, Jesus made it possible for us to live forever. Now death can be viewed as merely a rite of passage, going from the limitations of earthly life to the fullness of eternal life.

May the Lord continue to watch over all of us.

Blessings,

Fr. Ray, MSC

Reflections for the Holy Week by the Missionaries of the Sacred Heart

By Fr. Ray Diesbourg, MSC

(New York Community)

Greetings from a very quiet rectory at 139 N. Kanady (Cape Vincent, NY).  Still…the sun rises, the birds sing and the crows caw, the sun sets in a flurry of colors. And we will soon celebrate that the Son has truly risen.

It seemed to me that a letter might be a good way to keep in touch with many of you during this time of coronavirus physical distancing. I like the idea I’ve heard about it being “physical distancing” rather than “social distancing.” We do need to maintain our social interactions, whether by phone, email, skype, Facebook, letter, etc.

As I’ve been reflecting on what has been going on the last few weeks, I was reminded of Jesus in the desert for 40 days (1st Sunday Lent Gospel). We are having our own desert experience. And like Jesus, we need to keep communicating with our God.

Thank you one and all; God bless you.

Reflections for the Holy Week by the Missionaries of the Sacred Heart

By Fr. Steve Boland, MSC

(Pennsylvania Community)

Once again we enter into Holy Week. We remember the events that even now continue to give us hope for salvation, the life-giving death and Resurrection of Jesus Christ. This year we enter into these days while we are in the midst of the Coronavirus crisis. Just as the disciples of Jesus were filled with fear and with doubt when confronted with Jesus’ crucifixion, many people have these same feelings today. Many people mourn the loss of loved ones because of the virus, just as the disciples mourned the loss of Jesus. We pray for all of these people. The shadow of the cross continues to fall on us all. Yet we believe that the cross ultimately leads to new life. Jesus entered fully into our lives, not sparing himself from any of the misfortunes that befall us. It is in union with Him that we have hope even at this time of fear and pain. When Jesus rose from the dead, he still had the mark of his wounds visible on his glorified body. May he help us to see that our wounds, when united to His, do not lead us to darkness, but to the new light of life. As we carry the cross with Him, let us pray for courage and faith. By His wounds we are healed.

By Fr. Frank J. Timar, MSC

There are times and situations in all our lives when Jesus could easily say to us as he said to Judas, “Friend, do you betray the Son of Man with a kiss?” We might wonder, too, why we haven’t learned the lesson Jesus worked so hard to teach us, to love one another as He loves us. We look for someone else to blame. But, like it or not, we were there on the hill of Calvary, and we didn’t lift a finger to help Jesus.

Fr. Frank J. Timar, MSC (Pennsylvania Community)

Father Frank professed his first vows on September 14, 1952 and was ordained on July 13, 1958. He is in residence at our Sacred Heart Villa in Center Valley, Pennsylvania.

Page 3 of 8 1 2 3 4 5 8
© 2020 Missionaries of the Sacred Heart
Top
Follow us: